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a fallback plan for the so called "fiscal cliff", which includes extending tax cuts for the middle class and resuming a fight over spending and taxes for the wealthy later. meanwhile, going overseas, nato makes a move on the turkish border with syria. military officials deny preparations for military intervention. protesters in egypt march on the palace as mohamed morsi flees. international and domestic news is all on the table for you this morning as we open up the phone lines. also, send us a tweet. or post your comment on facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get back to that new york times story. first, some other headlines on the domestic front. here is the "washington times." also, sticking with the senate, the baltimore sun reporting this headline -- in politics, here is the denver post -- open phones before the first 30 minutes. we have a short show because the house is coming in at 9:00. steve in gaithersburg, maryland, a republican caller. caller: host: when did the republican party become the party that restricts poor? i understand the tax cut for the rich is important to so
heads back to work this morning as the clock is ticking down toward the impending fiscal cliff. talks, though, seem to be at a stalemate. yesterday with just 29 days until tax hikes and deep spending cuts kick in. both republicans and the democrats were running to the airwaves to try to explain their positions. here's what they said. >> what we're not going to do is extend those tax cuts with the wealthiest americans. those cost a trillion dollars over ten years and there's no possibility that we're going to find a way to get our fiscal house in order without those tax rates going back up. >> nobody wants to go over the cliff. that's why the day after the election i tried to speed this process up by making the concession to put revenues on the table. it's unfortunate that the white house has spent three weeks doing basically nothing. >> the administration has presented a plan that calls for $1.6 trillion in new tax revenues. $400 billion in cuts to medicare and other entitlements. $50 billion for a new stimulus and congress would have to give up control over raising the debt limit. re
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2